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February 11, 2019 - Comments Off on Phase Change CEO Steve Bucuvalas featured on the InfluenceNow! podcast

Phase Change CEO Steve Bucuvalas featured on the InfluenceNow! podcast

February 7, 2019

by Todd Erickson*

Phase Change’s Inventor, Founder, and CEO, Steve Bucuvalas, was featured in the January 31, 2019, episode of the InfluenceNow! podcast, hosted by Justin Craft^.

The InfluenceNow! podcast highlights startups, exceptional business influencers, and ideas from a variety of industries that influence the world.

Steve and Justin discussed how Phase Change and the technology behind Mia, the first cognitive agent for software development, became a reality.

The interview begins with Steve describing his career leading technology and artificial intelligence (AI) groups in financial services and insurance companies, and his subsequent entrepreneurial career starting and selling two different companies. He tells the story of how a single conversation with the buyer of his second company led to his interest in applying AI technology to the problem of software-development productivity.

At the closing, the buyer said to me, 'What's wrong with you guys in software? AI has changed financial services extraordinarily - increased our productivity 100 times,' which is accurate. 'Why can’t you do that with your own industry?'

That moment led Steve to research the barriers to applying AI to software development, and the development of the human-centric principles that led to the creation of the Mia cognitive agent.

The podcast continues with Steve and Justin discussing why organizations that rely on applications written in the Common Business-oriented Language (COBOL) programming language are Phase Change’s first target market.

COBOL is this 40-50 year-old language that has atrocious legacy problems. Because the code has been around [so long], it runs 85% of the world’s financial transactions and [there’s] 220 billion lines of [active COBOL] code. The programmers are all in their 60’s and they all want to retire, but they keep getting incentives to work a few more years because no one wants to learn COBOL. In fact, some of the kids in computer science [college courses] have never heard of it.

Justin and Steve conclude the interview discussing the productivity gains realized by Mia and Phase Change’s technology, and when it will be generally available.

To learn more about how Steve and Phase Change Software will radically improve software productivity, watch the podcast video below or listen to the audio podcast.


^Justin Craft is the Founder and CEO of Cast Influence, a Denver, Colorado,-based turnkey marketing agency. Phase Change Software is a client of Cast Influence.

*Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change Software. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.

February 4, 2019 - Comments Off on IEEE magazine publishes Phase Change research scientist co-authored paper

IEEE magazine publishes Phase Change research scientist co-authored paper

January 31, 2019

by Todd Erickson*

Phase Change research scientist Rahul Pandita’s co-written paper, “A Conceptual Framework for Engineering Chatbots,” was recently published in the November-December 2018 issue of IEEE Internet Computing^.

The industry magazine is published bi-monthly by the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Computer Society for evaluating and reviewing Internet-based computer applications and enabling technologies. It focuses on technologies and applications that enable practitioners to utilize Internet-based applications and tools, instead of having to build their own.

The paper

The use of chatbots as virtual assistants is becoming more widespread as companies strive to increase community engagement online and on social-media platforms.

The problem is that most commercially available bots are engineered with If-This-Then-That (IFTTT) frameworks from the 1980s. These decades-old frameworks often create inflexible chatbots that are difficult to maintain.

The bots can be monolithic and may mix dialog-managing rules with business-execution logic and response-generation rules. And when these chatbots must interact with third-party services to orchestrate workflows, the orchestration logic becomes entwined with the IFTTT rules.

Additionally, IFTTT tends to be order sensitive. As chatbots’ capabilities increase, their implementation rules grow more complex, and even simple modifications can require substantial effort.

The paper, “A Conceptual Framework for Engineering Chatbots,“ outlines a high-level conceptual framework founded upon agent-oriented abstractions – goals, plans, and commitments.

It theorizes that well-studied abstractions of goals and commitments from the area of artificial intelligence (AI) and multiagent systems allow for more flexible chatbots. Goals capture an agent’s intentions, and commitments capture meaningful business relationships between agents.

The paper describes how employing goals and commitments can enable a model chatbot that can be verified at design time or runtime, offers flexible enactments, and provides a basis for judging correctness.

Authors

In addition to Pandita, the paper is written by:

It is available free online for IEEE members, and can be purchased through the IEEE Xplore Digital Library.

*Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change Software. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.

^The figure represented in the featured image and the IEEE Internet Computing magazine cover are copyrighted by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc..

October 30, 2018 - Comments Off on COBOL is dead! Long live COBOL!
A living collection of COBOL articles

COBOL is dead! Long live COBOL!
A living collection of COBOL articles

updated October 30, 2018

by Todd Erickson

Despite its age and multiple reports of its impended death, the Common Business Oriented Language (COBOL) remains responsible for a large portion of the world’s daily financial transactions – credible estimates include as much as $3 trillion per day and roughly 90 percent of all ATM and in-person financial transactions.

COBOL was first published in January 1960 by the Conference on Data Systems Languages (CODASLY), who based it on the first compiler developed by Admiral Grace Hopper and her team at Remington Rand in 1952. It’s designed to develop portable business applications that could be run on systems developed by multiple manufacturers.

It remains vital to the world’s financial systems because of its simplicity and reliability.

One measure of its importance is the number of news and commentary articles published in reliable industry sources that repeat a common theme, namely that the programming language is ancient, nobody wants to use it, but it’s so vital to the financial and government sectors that it won’t go away – COBOL is dead! Long live COBOL!

Once or twice a year a new piece pops up and we typically pass it around the office, discuss new information or opinions it reveals, and archive it.

Recently, one of our shrewd colleagues suggested we post links to these articles here on our website so others in the small but influential COBOL community can reference them.

So we did. We’ll update this page when we discover new COBOL media pieces. If we’ve missed something important, email terickson@phasechange.ai.

Long live COBOL!

Articles

2018

Quartz Obsession: COBOL
What's going to happen when all the Baby-Boomer COBOL developers retire?
June 28, 2018
by Justin Sablich, qz.com
https://goo.gl/C7Ykv1

In digital transformation top banks are leading
Instead of ripping and replacing legacy systems and code, which can be prohibitively expensive and time consuming, some banks are maintaining these systems and wrapping customer engagement systems around them.
April 3, 2018
by Tom Groenfeldt, Forbes.com
https://goo.gl/W7WHHM

It’s Cobol all the way down
COBOL-based systems continue to run much of the world’s financial systems. But its supporting workforce is retiring and efforts to convert these applications to modern programming languages are expensive and time-consuming.
April 2018
by Glenn Fleishman, Increment.com
https://goo.gl/QpnUFa

2017

COBOL is everywhere. Who will maintain it?
Many of the world’s financial institutions and U.S. government agencies, such as Homeland Security, Department of Veterans Affairs, and Social Security, rely on COBOL-based systems, but a shortage of programming talent and education institutions that provide programming courses is on the horizon.
May 6, 2017
by David Cassel, The New Stack.io
https://goo.gl/InzR48

Trump said government has one 40-year-old IT system. It actually has at least 10.
A list of 10 U.S. government computer systems that are at least 40-years old. Three of the systems run on COBOL code.
April 12, 2017
by Frank Konkel, Nextgov.com
https://goo.gl/BSu37t

Banks scramble to fix old systems as IT 'cowboys' ride into sunset
Organizations that rely on Cobol-based applications have a hard time replacing retiring programmers and support personnel, which has given veteran developers opportunities to continue working, even after retirement.
April 9, 2017
by Anna Irrera, Reuters.com
https://goo.gl/TcxjXa

2016

Why it’s time to learn COBOL
Acquiring COBOL programming skills might be a wise career move. Hundreds-of-billions of lines of COBOL code are still in use and many universities have stopped offering classes in the 50+ year old language.
April 1, 2016
by Paul Rubens, CIO.com
https://goo.gl/Jkuj7G

2015

The inevitable return of COBOL
The looming shortage of COBOL programmers will inevitably lead to COBOL programming once again becoming an in-demand skill set.
July 6, 2015
by Ritika Trikha, HackerRank
https://goo.gl/EuSH6c

2014

CIOs should prepare for lack of Cobol (Yes, Cobol) developers
While the demand for talented and skilled Cobol programmers remains steady, the programming language’s lack of popularity has shrunk the available talent pool. As the existing Cobol support workforce ages and retires, companies are resorting to novel strategies to acquire and train staff.
October 2, 2014
by Sharon Florentine, CIO.com
https://goo.gl/1XA1KG

Cobol is dead. Long live Cobol!
CIOs that rely on Cobol-based systems keep developer staff as long as possible while others prefer new hires with multi-language capabilities over Cobol-specific or Cobol-only skills.
October 2, 2014
by Gary Beach, Wall Street Journal CIO Journal blogs
https://goo.gl/HmH5K8

All the rich kids are into COBOL – but why?
COBOL isn’t sexy or even that popular. But the basic tenants of supply and demand remain true – if there are still a lot of COBOL applications running critical systems and not a lot of programmers interested in learning the 50-year-old programming language, then brushing up on your COBOL skills might make it easier to find a job earning more money.
September 17, 2014
by Matt Asay, readwrite.com
https://goo.gl/AZNFPi

The government’s COBOL conundrum
The U.S. federal government’s Office of Personnel Management released its “Strategic Information Technology Plan” for revamping the agency’s IP operations. Part of the plan discusses the office’s plans for maintaining and eventually migrating away from the roughly 60-million-lines of production COBOL code that enable the agency to meet a number of its regulatory requirements.
June 2, 2014
by Nicole Blake Johnson, FedTech magazine.com
https://goo.gl/Sqeo6b

2012

Brain Drain: Where COBOL systems go from here
Not only does losing experienced COBOL programmers hurt many companies’ ability to maintain its mainframe systems, but it also means the loss of the programmers’ deep understanding of the business logic. A number of organizations are teaming with private businesses to educate younger programmers and team them with experienced developers before it’s too late.
May 21, 2012
by Robert L. Mitchell, CIO.com
https://goo.gl/8UKvPg

Cobol brain drain: Survey results
Results from the Compuworld survey on Cobol use in business and government, which showed that nearly 50 percent of respondents had operational Cobol-based systems and large number continue to develop new business applications with Cobol.
March 14, 2012
by Staff, Compuworld.com
https://goo.gl/oJdB3D

The future of COBOL: Why it won’t go away soon – Part 2
When thinking about maintaining or replacing their COBOL systems, companies must consider the employee angle. Can they continue to hire COBOL programmers when experts forecast that a major COBOL skills gap in on the horizon, and is that enough of a reason to rip and replace?
Date: January 11, 2012
by Brian Bloom, IT World Canada
https://goo.gl/ksDWkZ

The future of COBOL: Why it won’t go away soon – Part 1
COBOL-based systems will not be going away anytime soon because of the millions of invested man-hours and dollars already spent to develop these mainframe programs and the enormous predicted replacement costs. There’s also the fact that we don’t have anything better enough to make the change.
January 10, 2012
by Brian Bloom, IT World Canada
https://goo.gl/cRjaPk

Fun

*All images are copyrighted by their respective owners

Are you a COBOL programmer?
November 4, 1997
by Scott Adams, Dilbert.com
http://dilbert.com/strip/1997-11-04
Are you a COBOL programmer?

 

 

 

The Holy Grail of [programming] technology!
June 10, 1994
Scott Adams, dilbert.com
http://dilbert.com/strip/1994-06-10
It's the Holy Grail of programming! dilbert cartoon

 

 

 

 

Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.

January 25, 2018 - Comments Off on Introducing Mia — the first assistive AI for software development

Introducing Mia — the first assistive AI for software development

January 25, 2018

by Todd Erickson

Phase Change proudly presents our maiden in-house video, featuring Mia, the first assistive AI for software development.

Mia helps organizations retain the expert knowledge encoded in software. Developers, stakeholders, and executives can use this knowledge to better understand their applications and increase development productivity by a factor of 100.

Learn why founder and CEO Steve Bucuvalas first began to envision the technology and see how Mia collaborates like an expert to help users explore and comprehend their software.

Discover why one executive said, "I never thought I'd see this in my lifetime."

 

 

Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.

July 10, 2017 - Comments Off on Phase Change will bridge application knowledge silos

Phase Change will bridge application knowledge silos

July 10, 2017

by Todd Erickson

Members of Phase Change's management team address how our technology will bring together an organization's siloed application knowledge to enable faster responses to market demands.

It's a paradox. Your most successful applications get larger and more complex with updates, upgrades, and new features until they become difficult to change and adapt. Now they are hard-to-manage legacy systems that cost ever more time and money to remain valuable.

One of the main reasons applications become difficult to maintain is that knowledge silos emerge – where various people in development and other departments understand small portions of the code, but no one person knows the entire code base.

Then when you bring people together to develop new features that will address market demands or opportunities, each contributor only knows his or her portion of the application code, each person has his or her own mental model of the code, and all of that knowledge is difficult to share.

Learn how Phase Change's assistive AI agent will bridge knowledge silos by understanding the entire code base, presenting a complete and accurate model, and collaborating with engineers and stakeholders.

Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.

June 26, 2017 - Comments Off on Understanding code is the key to software development

Understanding code is the key to software development

June 26, 2017

By Elizabeth Richards and Todd Erickson

Discover how software developers are like archaeologists, and why understanding source code involves a lot more than digging.

Software engineers are often called developers. However, according to a number of experienced programmers, they spend the great majority of their time (78%) simply searching and understanding existing software, and the rest of their time (22%) actually modifying legacy software or developing new applications.

Programmers are forced to spend so much time finding and comprehending code because current tools and techniques are not technically savvy, and they are too focused on the searching process. They don't help developers understand how the code works together within the systems they serve.

In fact, a recent blog post compared the source-code searching process to archeology. It's a reasonable analogy given that the tools developers use are only slightly more advanced than rudimentary shovels and brushes.

Why is software development – an activity that's driving incredible technological change – so far behind the curve in building tools that help programmers comprehend the code they work on?

Artifacts

Searching for ancient relics and specific lines of code are both complex processes.

An archeologist doesn't use a bulldozer and dig in random locations. She researches excavation sites and uses advanced technology, such as satellite imagery to find optimum exploration locales and ground-penetrating radar for mapping. Then she carefully and methodically removes topsoil while analyzing and recording each artifact down to the smallest pottery shard.

Every relic she unearths builds her knowledge of the site, and the people and culture she's investigating. For example, the archaeologist may assemble a handful of pottery shards into a serving dish, which she studies alongside other artifacts to better understand an ancient culture's family meal rituals. She can easily share the dish with other scholars and store it for future analysis.

Each discovered artifact may also modify how she approaches the rest of the dig.

Code

In software development, Professor Vaclav Rajlich asserts that the processes of searching and understanding code require two phases called concept location and impact analysis. Concept location involves finding the lines of code to be modified and the relevant but disjoined source surrounding it.

Impact analysis examines how a proposed modification will impact the entire application, including performance, stability, intent, and secondary consequences in distant modules. Poor or incomplete impact analysis can lead to more bugs.

In essence, a developer spends his time in active knowledge construction, building an integrated mental model so he understands how a system is constructed and its purpose and intended results. Only then can he be confident enough to make changes.

Errors logs, debuggers, and grepping assist developers in finding specific lines of code – his shards of pottery. But the developer must reconstruct the code into the mental models necessary for understanding the system. And these models remain locked away in the developer's mind, making them difficult to share and retrieve over time.

The greatest shovel ever invented

But it doesn’t have to be that way. Phase Change’s technology will transform how developers search and understand source code and applications. A programmer will no longer have to manually and laboriously search and play connect-the-dots to build mental models.

We are developing assistive artificial intelligence (AI) that automatically analyzes source code and understands the human intent behind it, creating immersive application-visualizations that resemble a programmer’s mental models. These visualizations can be stored, retrieved, and shared similar to how an archaeologist saves and shares the artifacts she assembles.

A developer will collaborate with our AI agent using natural language to effortlessly locate source and move quickly beyond simply identifying concept locations to performing comprehensive impact analysis. He will be aware of every effect his modifications bring about, and work confidently with a rich understanding of the code and the application.

Because the goal isn't to search, it's to understand.

learn more about our technology

 

 

Elizabeth Richards is Phase Change's director of business operations. You can reach her at erichards@phasechange.ai.
Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.

May 25, 2017 - Comments Off on Why is Cobol cool again? – blog

Why is Cobol cool again? – blog

May 25, 2017

by Todd Erickson and Elizabeth Richards

Discover why the recent spotlight on Cobol systems and the shortage of qualified Cobol programmers isn’t due to a lack of qualified engineers, it's due to a lack of knowledge.

Reuters and The New Stack recently published articles about Cobol, an often-overlooked programming language that was developed before John F. Kennedy became the 35th President of the United States.

At Phase Change, we pay attention to legacy systems and their challenges. So, why was a mainframe language developed in 1959 suddenly the topic of multiple news articles?

The U.S. government developed the common business oriented language (Cobol) in conjunction with Rear Admiral Grace Hopper and a coalition of industry and higher-education envoys. It's simplicity and portability have stood the test of time, and are the main reasons why 50-year-old Cobol applications continue to play a critical role in finance, banking, and government operations. That plus the inertia that characterizes large, critical systems.

Organizations like the Department of Veteran Affairs and large financial companies, such as Bank of New York Mellon and Barclays PLC, are examples of the types of institutions that rely on Cobol applications for nearly $3 trillion worth of daily transactions. But they’ve used Cobol for decades, so, that doesn't explain the recent attention.

It's because the engineers that maintain Cobol-based systems are leaving the workforce, there aren't qualified developers available to replace them, and these institutions are freaking out. The Cobol brain drain is threatening the organizations that economies are built upon.

Brain drain refers to how departing software engineers leave with all of their system and domain knowledge supposedly locked away in their brains. That knowledge is thought to be lost from the organization forever.

The average age of a Cobol programmer is somewhere between 45 and 60 years old and they are retiring. The problem is that few programmers are interested in replacing them, and the availability of Cobol training resources has dropped precipitously because it's just not a cool language anymore.

We won't repeat all of the statistics that show how much Cobol code is still in use and how important those systems are. Read the Reuters and The New Stack articles, which both mirror a series of comprehensive feature articles published by ComputerWorld in 2012. The metrics and themes haven’t changed much.

You can also follow the "official" Cobol Twitter account, @morecobol (spoiler: it's clever).

Basically, these companies have three options to deal with Cobol brain drain, and all involve high risks. First, they can simply replace their Cobol systems with systems built on more modern programming languages. That project took the Commonwealth Bank of Australia 5 years and $749.9 million, which was 30% over budget. The risk associated with implementing such a massive new system has kept most financial institutions from doing it.

Second, they can engage consultants like the Cobol Cowboys, or hire and train new programmers to support their Cobol systems. This option also involves a great amount of risk because companies have to find engineers that have the skills and interest to support Cobol applications, and then hope they can unravel the layers of modifications and system integrations that accrue with five decades of maintenance, usually with little documentation.

Third, they can completely stop modifying core systems that nobody understands, but are too critical to risk changing or replacing. The USDA faced that choice.

It's not a people problem

But from our perspective, the issue is not a human-resources problem. The companies that rely on Cobol-based systems don't lack the right people, they lack the right knowledge.

If the new engineers assigned to work on Cobol-based applications could access the departing developers' system and domain knowledge, or better yet, all of the programming and domain knowledge imbued into the system from prior engineers, imagine how much easier it would be for them to comprehend these complex systems. It would be like having a personal mentor always available — even while the previous engineers are off enjoying retirement.

That's why this is a knowledge problem and not a people problem.

It's a huge opportunity for someone that can reach all of that trapped knowledge and make it easily comprehensible.

Exploiting the knowledge left behind

Phase Change's objective aim is to use our assistive AI technology to unlock all of the trapped programming and domain knowledge – as well as the human intent behind it – inside software applications, no matter which programming languages were used to create them, and make it easy to access that knowledge with natural-language interaction.

Engineers and stakeholders will literally talk to their software applications to reveal the hidden encoded knowledge they require to comprehend the overwhelming scale and complexity resulting from decades of modifications and system mergers, and hundreds of contributing developers.

Unlocking the encoded knowledge that's trapped in Cobol system will give these large institutions the knowledge they need to make informed decisions about their legacy systems.

learn more about our technology

 

 

Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.
Elizabeth Richards is Phase Change's director of business operations. You can reach her at erichards@phasechange.ai.

May 8, 2017 - Comments Off on Phase Change creates scale-free software development – video

Phase Change creates scale-free software development – video

May 8, 2017

Learn how Phase Change's assistive AI creates scale-free software engineering and enables the development team to swiftly respond to market demands.

As software systems grow in size and complexity, they can easily become incomprehensible for individual engineers. They simply get too large and sophisticated for one person to fully understand. As more people are required to comprehend and maintain complex systems, the organization's ability to modify those systems and respond to changing market dynamics diminishes.

Watch President Gary Brach, Director of Engineering Ken Hei, and Senior Software Architect Brad Cleavenger, discuss how system scale affects the ability to modify applications and meet market demands, and how Phase change's assistive AI minimizes scale issues to create scale-free software.

April 24, 2017 - Comments Off on Why Phase Change will fundamentally change software development – video

Why Phase Change will fundamentally change software development – video

April 24, 2017

Gary Brach, Ken Hei, and Brad Cleavenger discuss how Phase Change's assistive AI technology will fundamentally change how software is developed so organizations can quickly and confidently respond to changing market dynamics.

While transformative advances in automation, communications' networking, and computer processing in the last 20 years have vastly improved business operations, the same cannot be said for software development.

The process of developing the applications that now run our daily lives hasn't significantly changed since the 1970s.

Sure, we've developed better tools and better ways of communicating with one another during the development process – such agile development techniques – but the underlying software development activities are the same.

This lack of substantial improvement makes it difficult for organizations to quickly respond to changing market dynamics.

However, the future of software development is bright. Organizations will soon be able to quickly and confidently respond to changing market dynamics.

Phase Change's technology will fundamentally transform how software is developed by introducing our assistive AI into the process – enabling organizations to quickly respond to market changes and opportunities.

Watch the following video below to learn why Gary Brach, Ken Hei, and Brad Cleavenger believe Phase Change's technology will fundamentally change the software development process.

April 10, 2017 - Comments Off on Prevent software application knowledge from walking out the door – blog

Prevent software application knowledge from walking out the door – blog

April 10, 2017

by Todd Erickson, Tech Writer

Brain drain is a serious problem facing organizations that use software applications to run their businesses. Learn how you can seal the drain and retain all of the knowledge trapped in your applications.

At the end of every workday, your software development teams walk out the door with all of their knowledge leaving with them. Some of them don’t come back, and that loss of information and expertise, or brain drain, is a growing business problem, especially with IT industry turnover rates hovering between 20-30% annually.

Consider how much knowledge your organization loses when key members of your development team retire or join other companies. Not only do you lose development expertise, but the knowledge your engineers have regarding how your software applications work, such as:

  • How the system is architected
  • The subject-matter expertise used to implement functionality
  • The business considerations that drove product and feature designs
  • How third-party and external systems are integrated

The plight of developing and supporting older and large-scale applications is exacerbated when companies have to scramble to replace retiring software engineers with unqualified replacements. Multiple reports suggest that 10,000 Baby Boomers walk out the corporate door in the U.S. for good every day.

Many of these retirees are the software engineers that developed and maintain the many systems that still run on Cobol and other mainframe programming languages. The impact of losing thousands of mainframe engineers and their vast programming and business knowledge will be widespread. The 240 billion lines of Cobol code running today power approximately 85 percent of all daily business transactions worldwide.

Most organizations don't have the processes in place to capture their employees' business and system intelligence before they leave for good.

It’s especially difficult for engineers. Today’s software tools don't allow them to easily convey their expertise to others – or enable developers, business managers, and executives to easily discover and utilize any previously shared knowledge.

What can you do?

You might be surprised to discover that your engineers’ domain and system knowledge already resides in one other place outside their minds – your software. While creating the code, development teams pour their organization, programming, and business intelligence into your applications.

Imagine what you could do if your organization's technical and business stakeholders had access to all of the knowledge and human intent embedded in your software applications. Imagine asking your software application how it works and having it answer you back.

How can you unlock all of that untapped knowledge?

Liberate encoded knowledge

Phase Change Software is creating AI-assistive technology that unlocks the encoded knowledge embedded in your software applications.

Our assistive AI understands your software and turns it into formal units of knowledge. In essence, software is transformed into data.

Our AI assistant will liberate your software's hidden knowledge and help it understand itself. Our natural language processing (NLP) techniques will enable your technical and business stakeholders to easily interact with applications.

You will soon be able to literally have a conversation with your software, and have it teach you its encoded programming, business, and domain knowledge.

learn more about our technology

 

 

Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change Software. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.