All Posts in Technology

February 11, 2019 - Comments Off on Phase Change CEO Steve Bucuvalas featured on the InfluenceNow! podcast

Phase Change CEO Steve Bucuvalas featured on the InfluenceNow! podcast

February 7, 2019

by Todd Erickson1

Phase Change’s Inventor, Founder, and CEO, Steve Bucuvalas, was featured in the January 31, 2019, episode of the InfluenceNow! podcast, hosted by Justin Craft2.

The InfluenceNow! podcast highlights startups, exceptional business influencers, and ideas from a variety of industries that influence the world.

Steve and Justin discussed how Phase Change and the technology behind Mia, the first cognitive agent for software development, became a reality.

The interview begins with Steve describing his career leading technology and artificial intelligence (AI) groups in financial services and insurance companies, and his subsequent entrepreneurial career starting and selling two different companies. He tells the story of how a single conversation with the buyer of his second company led to his interest in applying AI technology to the problem of software-development productivity.

At the closing, the buyer said to me, 'What's wrong with you guys in software? AI has changed financial services extraordinarily - increased our productivity 100 times,' which is accurate. 'Why can’t you do that with your own industry?'

That moment led Steve to research the barriers to applying AI to software development, and the development of the human-centric principles that led to the creation of the Mia cognitive agent.

The podcast continues with Steve and Justin discussing why organizations that rely on applications written in the Common Business-oriented Language (COBOL) programming language are Phase Change’s first target market.

COBOL is this 40-50 year-old language that has atrocious legacy problems. Because the code has been around [so long], it runs 85% of the world’s financial transactions and [there’s] 220 billion lines of [active COBOL] code. The programmers are all in their 60’s and they all want to retire, but they keep getting incentives to work a few more years because no one wants to learn COBOL. In fact, some of the kids in computer science [college courses] have never heard of it.

Justin and Steve conclude the interview discussing the productivity gains realized by Mia and Phase Change’s technology, and when it will be generally available.

To learn more about how Steve and Phase Change Software will radically improve software productivity, watch the podcast video below or listen to the audio podcast.


1Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change Software. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.
2Justin Craft is the Founder and CEO of Cast Influence, a Denver, Colorado,-based turnkey marketing agency. Phase Change Software is a client of Cast Influence.

February 4, 2019 - Comments Off on IEEE magazine publishes Phase Change research scientist co-authored paper

IEEE magazine publishes Phase Change research scientist co-authored paper

January 31, 2019

by Todd Erickson*

Phase Change research scientist Rahul Pandita’s co-written paper, “A Conceptual Framework for Engineering Chatbots,” was recently published in the November-December 2018 issue of IEEE Internet Computing^.

The industry magazine is published bi-monthly by the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Computer Society for evaluating and reviewing Internet-based computer applications and enabling technologies. It focuses on technologies and applications that enable practitioners to utilize Internet-based applications and tools, instead of having to build their own.

The paper

The use of chatbots as virtual assistants is becoming more widespread as companies strive to increase community engagement online and on social-media platforms.

The problem is that most commercially available bots are engineered with If-This-Then-That (IFTTT) frameworks from the 1980s. These decades-old frameworks often create inflexible chatbots that are difficult to maintain.

The bots can be monolithic and may mix dialog-managing rules with business-execution logic and response-generation rules. And when these chatbots must interact with third-party services to orchestrate workflows, the orchestration logic becomes entwined with the IFTTT rules.

Additionally, IFTTT tends to be order sensitive. As chatbots’ capabilities increase, their implementation rules grow more complex, and even simple modifications can require substantial effort.

The paper, “A Conceptual Framework for Engineering Chatbots,“ outlines a high-level conceptual framework founded upon agent-oriented abstractions – goals, plans, and commitments.

It theorizes that well-studied abstractions of goals and commitments from the area of artificial intelligence (AI) and multiagent systems allow for more flexible chatbots. Goals capture an agent’s intentions, and commitments capture meaningful business relationships between agents.

The paper describes how employing goals and commitments can enable a model chatbot that can be verified at design time or runtime, offers flexible enactments, and provides a basis for judging correctness.

Authors

In addition to Pandita, the paper is written by:

It is available free online for IEEE members, and can be purchased through the IEEE Xplore Digital Library.

*Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change Software. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.

^The figure represented in the featured image and the IEEE Internet Computing magazine cover are copyrighted by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc..

October 30, 2018 - Comments Off on COBOL is dead! Long live COBOL!
A living collection of COBOL articles

COBOL is dead! Long live COBOL!
A living collection of COBOL articles

updated October 30, 2018

by Todd Erickson

To stay up-to-date with the latest news and commentary surrounding COBOL-based applications, we track and archive COBOL-related online articles. Below is our current collection of stories, which we try to update frequently.

Excerpt

It’s Cobol all the way down
COBOL-based systems continue to run much of the world’s financial systems. But its supporting workforce is retiring and efforts to convert these applications to modern programming languages are expensive and time-consuming.
April 2018
by Glenn Fleishman, Increment.com
https://goo.gl/QpnUFa

Brain Drain: Where COBOL systems go from here
Not only does losing experienced COBOL programmers hurt many companies’ ability to maintain its mainframe systems, but it also means the loss of the programmers’ deep understanding of the business logic. A number of organizations are teaming with private businesses to educate younger programmers and team them with experienced developers before it’s too late.
May 21, 2012
by Robert L. Mitchell, CIO.com
https://goo.gl/8UKvPg

Read more at CodeCatalyst.ai

January 25, 2018 - Comments Off on Introducing Mia — the first assistive AI for software development

Introducing Mia — the first assistive AI for software development

January 25, 2018

by Todd Erickson

Phase Change proudly presents our maiden in-house video, featuring Mia, the first assistive AI for software development.

Mia helps organizations retain the expert knowledge encoded in software. Developers, stakeholders, and executives can use this knowledge to better understand their applications and increase development productivity by a factor of 100.

Learn why founder and CEO Steve Bucuvalas first began to envision the technology and see how Mia collaborates like an expert to help users explore and comprehend their software.

Discover why one executive said, "I never thought I'd see this in my lifetime."

 

 

Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.

July 10, 2017 - Comments Off on Phase Change will bridge application knowledge silos

Phase Change will bridge application knowledge silos

July 10, 2017

by Todd Erickson

Members of Phase Change's management team address how our technology will bring together an organization's siloed application knowledge to enable faster responses to market demands.

It's a paradox. Your most successful applications get larger and more complex with updates, upgrades, and new features until they become difficult to change and adapt. Now they are hard-to-manage legacy systems that cost ever more time and money to remain valuable.

One of the main reasons applications become difficult to maintain is that knowledge silos emerge – where various people in development and other departments understand small portions of the code, but no one person knows the entire code base.

Then when you bring people together to develop new features that will address market demands or opportunities, each contributor only knows his or her portion of the application code, each person has his or her own mental model of the code, and all of that knowledge is difficult to share.

Learn how Phase Change's assistive AI agent will bridge knowledge silos by understanding the entire code base, presenting a complete and accurate model, and collaborating with engineers and stakeholders.

Todd Erickson is a tech writer with Phase Change. You can reach him at terickson@phasechange.ai.

June 26, 2017 - Comments Off on Understanding code is the key to software development

Understanding code is the key to software development

June 26, 2017

By Elizabeth Richards and Todd Erickson

Discover how software developers are like archaeologists, and why understanding source code – the key to software development – involves a lot more than digging. You can read more about it at CodeCatalyst.ai.

Excerpt

Software engineers are often called developers. However, according to a number of experienced programmers, they spend the great majority of their time (78%) simply searching and understanding existing software, and the rest of their time (22%) actually modifying legacy software or developing new applications.

Programmers are forced to spend so much time finding and comprehending code because current tools and techniques are not technically savvy, and they are too focused on the searching process. They don't help developers understand how the code works together within the systems they serve.

Read more at CodeCatalyst.ai

May 25, 2017 - Comments Off on Why is Cobol cool again? – blog

Why is Cobol cool again? – blog

May 25, 2017

by Todd Erickson and Elizabeth Richards

Discover why the recent spotlight on Cobol systems and the shortage of qualified Cobol programmers isn’t due to a lack of qualified engineers, it's due to a lack of knowledge. You can read more at CodeCatalyst.ai.

Excerpt

At Phase Change, we pay attention to legacy systems and their challenges. So, why was a mainframe language developed in 1959 suddenly the topic of multiple news articles?

Reuters and The New Stack recently published articles about Cobol, an often-overlooked programming language that was developed before John F. Kennedy became the 35th President of the United States.

Organizations like the Department of Veteran Affairs and large financial companies, such as Bank of New York Mellon and Barclays PLC, are examples of the types of institutions that rely on Cobol applications for nearly $3 trillion worth of daily transactions. But they’ve used Cobol for decades, so, that doesn't explain the recent attention.

Read more at CodeCatalyst.ai

May 8, 2017 - Comments Off on Phase Change creates scale-free software development – video

Phase Change creates scale-free software development – video

May 8, 2017

Learn how Phase Change's assistive AI creates scale-free software engineering and enables the development team to swiftly respond to market demands.

As software systems grow in size and complexity, they can easily become incomprehensible for individual engineers. They simply get too large and sophisticated for one person to fully understand. As more people are required to comprehend and maintain complex systems, the organization's ability to modify those systems and respond to changing market dynamics diminishes.

Watch President Gary Brach, Director of Engineering Ken Hei, and Senior Software Architect Brad Cleavenger, discuss how system scale affects the ability to modify applications and meet market demands, and how Phase change's assistive AI minimizes scale issues to create scale-free software.

April 24, 2017 - Comments Off on Why Phase Change will fundamentally change software development – video

Why Phase Change will fundamentally change software development – video

April 24, 2017

Gary Brach, Ken Hei, and Brad Cleavenger discuss how Phase Change's assistive AI technology will fundamentally change how software is developed so organizations can quickly and confidently respond to changing market dynamics.

While transformative advances in automation, communications' networking, and computer processing in the last 20 years have vastly improved business operations, the same cannot be said for software development.

The process of developing the applications that now run our daily lives hasn't significantly changed since the 1970s.

Sure, we've developed better tools and better ways of communicating with one another during the development process – such agile development techniques – but the underlying software development activities are the same.

This lack of substantial improvement makes it difficult for organizations to quickly respond to changing market dynamics.

However, the future of software development is bright. Organizations will soon be able to quickly and confidently respond to changing market dynamics.

Phase Change's technology will fundamentally transform how software is developed by introducing our assistive AI into the process – enabling organizations to quickly respond to market changes and opportunities.

Watch the following video below to learn why Gary Brach, Ken Hei, and Brad Cleavenger believe Phase Change's technology will fundamentally change the software development process.

April 10, 2017 - Comments Off on Prevent software application knowledge from walking out the door – blog

Prevent software application knowledge from walking out the door – blog

April 10, 2017

by Todd Erickson, Tech Writer

Brain drain is a serious problem facing organizations that use software applications to run their businesses. Learn how you can seal the drain and retain all of the knowledge trapped in your applications. Read more about it at CodeCatalyst.ai.

Excerpt

At the end of every workday, your software development teams walk out the door with all of their knowledge leaving with them. Some of them don’t come back, and that loss of information and expertise, or brain drain, is a growing business problem, especially with IT industry turnover rates hovering between 20-30% annually.

Consider how much knowledge your organization loses when key members of your development team retire or join other companies. Not only do you lose development expertise, but the knowledge your engineers have regarding how your software applications work, such as:

  • How the system is architected
  • The subject-matter expertise used to implement functionality
  • The business considerations that drove product and feature designs
  • How third-party and external systems are integrated

Read more at CodeCatalyst.ai